This impressive monument to the important battle is across the Anthony Wayne Trail from the actual battlefield. A bike/pedestrian bridge connects the two sites. Owned by Ohio History Connection, the monument is situated on a bluff overlooking Side Cut Metropark and the beautiful Maumee River.

{"id":1,"title":"Fallen Timbers Battlefield Monument","default":true,"thumb":"","img":{"src":"https:\/\/www.fallentimbersbattlefield.org\/wp-content\/uploads\/2021\/02\/monument-pano-6190x3095-1-4000x2000.jpg","width":4000},"hotspots":[{"id":1,"type":"image","image":"https:\/\/www.fallentimbersbattlefield.org\/wp-content\/uploads\/2021\/02\/greenville-treaty-full.jpg","title":"Greenville Treaty","position":{"yaw":0.16449805451726363,"pitch":-0.30113073800510115},"popup":{"titleColor":"#000000","titleBgColor":"#ffffff"}},{"id":2,"type":"image","image":"https:\/\/www.fallentimbersbattlefield.org\/wp-content\/uploads\/2021\/02\/the-battle-full.jpg","title":"To Chief Little Turtle","position":{"yaw":-0.2118429041863763,"pitch":0.416845263701477},"popup":{"titleColor":"#000000","titleBgColor":"#ffffff"}},{"id":3,"type":"image","image":"https:\/\/www.fallentimbersbattlefield.org\/wp-content\/uploads\/2021\/02\/indian-warfare-full.jpg","title":"Indian 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Rock","position":{"yaw":1.9887851267981542,"pitch":0.28337055848895076},"popup":{"titleColor":"#000000","titleBgColor":"#ffffff"}},{"id":7,"type":"image","image":"https:\/\/www.fallentimbersbattlefield.org\/wp-content\/uploads\/2021\/02\/turkey-foot-rock-offering.jpg","title":"Offering","position":{"yaw":2.0439211166334754,"pitch":0.5378923363266104},"popup":{"titleColor":"#000000","titleBgColor":"#ffffff"}},{"id":8,"type":"image","image":"https:\/\/www.fallentimbersbattlefield.org\/wp-content\/uploads\/2021\/02\/plaque.jpg","title":"Landmark Plaque","position":{"yaw":0.2674407646871231,"pitch":-0.2928853608176816},"popup":{"titleColor":"#000000","titleBgColor":"#ffffff"}},{"id":9,"type":"image","image":"https:\/\/www.fallentimbersbattlefield.org\/wp-content\/uploads\/2021\/02\/in-memoriam.jpg","title":"In Memoriam","position":{"yaw":2.4478095848553156,"pitch":0.21311046472894724},"popup":{"titleColor":"#000000","titleBgColor":"#ffffff"}},{"id":10,"type":"image","image":"https:\/\/www.fallentimbersbattlefield.org\/wp-content\/uploads\/2021\/02\/in-memoriam-marker.jpg","title":"In Memoriam Marker","position":{"yaw":2.674260820723296,"pitch":0.23581901426530294},"popup":{"titleColor":"#000000","titleBgColor":"#ffffff"}},{"id":11,"type":"image","image":"https:\/\/www.fallentimbersbattlefield.org\/wp-content\/uploads\/2021\/02\/in-memory.jpg","title":"In Memory","position":{"yaw":-2.3424471759456313,"pitch":0.33525780188237064},"popup":{"titleColor":"#000000","titleBgColor":"#ffffff"}},{"id":12,"type":"image","image":"https:\/\/www.fallentimbersbattlefield.org\/wp-content\/uploads\/2021\/02\/in-memory-marker.jpg","title":"In Memory Marker","position":{"yaw":-2.5447587347243914,"pitch":0.1519490663517189},"popup":{"titleColor":"#000000","titleBgColor":"#ffffff"}},{"id":14,"type":"text","title":"Test Text","position":{"yaw":-0.9285226574412135,"pitch":-0.2011945294597659},"popup":{"titleColor":"#000000","titleBgColor":"#ffffff"},"text":"<p>This lovely mural of the Battle of Fallen Timbers that we see before us here at St. Luke\u2019s Auditorium depicts one of the most important battles in U.S. history.\u00a0 But the story behind its creation reinforces the importance of this battle not only to US historians, but also to the people living in this area.\u00a0 This painting is 25\u2019 wide and 15\u2019 high, and at the time it was painted was the largest painting in this part of the United States.\u00a0 It was specifically commissioned to fill a place of great prominence in the newly renovated People\u2019s Savings Association in downtown Toledo.\u00a0 The Bank had opened in this location in 1909, and had acquired additional property in which to expand its premises.\u00a0 They created a new and elaborate lobby, and wanted to have a painting created to be the focal point.<\/p>\n<p>An Italian artist, Ettore Caser, of the Venetian school of painting was trained as an artist in Italy , and then came to the United States.\u00a0 He used the egg tempura method of painting that holds color longer and allows for a softer technique that is still permanent.\u00a0 He studied the subject matter and prepared for the painting of the mural for over three months, and then painted the mural in the lobby on a specially created easel due to the large size of the painting.\u00a0 At one point, they had to stop the renovation process of the building so that the painting could be completed without damage from dust.\u00a0 The lobby of the bank would be the home of this extraordinary painting for 87 years.\u00a0 People\u2019s Savings paid Mr. Caser $17, 500 to paint this work \u2013 in today\u2019s money that would be over a quarter of a million dollars.\u00a0 The beautiful lobby of the bank led one\u2019s eyes immediately to the painting high on the back wall as one entered the lobby.\u00a0 The painting was surrounded by a brass frame which is itself a work of art, and so heavy the wall had to be specifically reinforced to hold the weight.\u00a0<\/p>\n<p>Context is important in understanding the significance of this painting.\u00a0 The year it was painted \u2013 1930, only months after the beginning of the Great Depression.\u00a0 To understand the impact of the depression on banking in Toledo, by 1933, 7 out of 10 banks in Toledo had closed. The Willys Jeep plant was in receivership and unemployment in Toledo was at an all-time high.\u00a0 Yet, People\u2019s Savings Bank was confident enough to complete its renovations.\u00a0 The painting could have been of anything \u2013 the bank\u2019s founders, or the founding of the country, - but the bank management specifically chose this event to grace the walls of the new lobby \u2013 they were interviewed by the newspaper and said the mural was being created \u201cthat the most significant historical event in the Maumee Valley \u2013 the Battle of Fallen Timbers \u2013 may live in the memories of Toledoans.\u201d<\/p>\n<p>The style is post-impressionist and the use of paint is in the Venetian style using egg yolks to bind the colors rather than oil.\u00a0 It is a difficult method because the paints dry quickly.\u00a0 The painting is on a huge canvas stretched on a wooden fretwork that also weighs hundreds of pounds.\u00a0 Dave Ball, the owner of the old People\u2019s Savings building downtown is determined that the building will be refurbished and re-opened but feared the destruction or damage of the painting during construction.\u00a0 He also wanted the painting to be housed on the Battlefield, and in that regard contacted the Battlefield Commission.\u00a0 Currently, the Battlefield has no place to display such a large artifact, and a search for an appropriate location in this vicinity took place.\u00a0 St.Luke\u2019s generously allowed the painting to be moved here so that the public could see and enjoy it until its final destination can be determined. This is an appropriate place, since it has now been determined that the hospital sits on a portion of what has been discovered to be the Battlefield.\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0<\/p>\n<p>We are now able to see and discover more details about the battle with the painting at eye level than ever before.\u00a0 Many discoveries about the Battlefield have been made since 1930, but the painting is still valuable as a time capsule of the knowledge of the battle when it was painted, and it is certainly a beautiful vision of the Battlefield to study.<\/p>"}],"position":{"yaw":-0.24616160559159717,"pitch":0.04257349735800453,"fov":1.4283865221995677}}
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